Revenge Travel

Revenge Travel

We partnered with a global company to deliver a multi-layered program that would address their need for a new and effective talent management strategy. You may be sitting in the same position right now, where you have an influx of new employees while people are leaving. So within your talent management strategy, the first component, when you have a new employee coming on is your onboarding process.

Now is the perfect time for you to challenge yourselves and re-evaluate your best onboarding practices. What we have found is that this is the time that we need to create personalized onboarding processes. There is no longer bringing a group in and having this “one size fits all” strategy. Certainly can we have a group do an orientation, might we have a group go through some training on your systems and tools?

Absolutely – but we cannot be remiss about addressing the individual and what their needs are.

Last week, I talked about leading with humanity; that each person comes into your environment with their own thoughts, feelings, and experiences. So you as a leader, it’s your responsibility that in addition to the mass approach, you’re also pulling the individual aside and creating a personalized onboarding process for them. I’m going to give you three questions that you as a leader should be asking when you have a new employee joining your team.

Number one is, “Tell me what your future vision looks like.” This is not about, what job title do you want next, what exact department do you want? Open the conversation to have them share with you what their strengths are, where they see themselves being utilized. If they see themselves in an office or working remote, if they see themselves collaborating or working independently.

Get a sense of the bigger picture of where they want to go in the future, so that you can then create the plan for them moving ahead. Number two, you need to ask what motivates them.

We want to inspire frequently, motivate occasionally.

But during the times when you do need to motivate, you need to understand how the individual wants to be motivated. Each of us are pushed by certain things, and most often different things. Don’t assume that every single one of your direct reports is motivated by the same thing.

One person may be motivated by a bonus, another person may be motivated by time off, yet another person may be motivated by flexibility. So ask each person as they’re coming onboard, or quite frankly now is your opportunity to ask even your current existing team members, what motivates them. And then finally, number three, ask them, “What are you interested in learning most right now?”

I love asking this question. First of all, it puts the onus on them to decide what they should be learning, what excites them. Then you as their leader can support them in coming up with the game plan to get them there. Which the game plan doesn’t necessarily mean that you’re offering all of the training, but it puts that responsibility on them to be thinking, “Hey, I should be learning something new. What is that?”

Then co-create, collaborate together on building that plan and stay close with them as they are going through that learning and development. Again, perfect time for you to be re-evaluating your onboarding process! If you have several new employees coming in during this time of reshuffling, and really taking the opportunity to create a personalized approach to your onboarding process. Now is the time, get started!

Your Onboarding Process Isn’t Enough

Your Onboarding Process Isn’t Enough

We partnered with a global company to deliver a multi-layered program that would address their need for a new and effective talent management strategy. You may be sitting in the same position right now, where you have an influx of new employees while people are leaving. So within your talent management strategy, the first component, when you have a new employee coming on is your onboarding process.

Now is the perfect time for you to challenge yourselves and re-evaluate your best onboarding practices. What we have found is that this is the time that we need to create personalized onboarding processes. There is no longer bringing a group in and having this “one size fits all” strategy. Certainly can we have a group do an orientation, might we have a group go through some training on your systems and tools?

Absolutely – but we cannot be remiss about addressing the individual and what their needs are.

Last week, I talked about leading with humanity; that each person comes into your environment with their own thoughts, feelings, and experiences. So you as a leader, it’s your responsibility that in addition to the mass approach, you’re also pulling the individual aside and creating a personalized onboarding process for them. I’m going to give you three questions that you as a leader should be asking when you have a new employee joining your team.

Number one is, “Tell me what your future vision looks like.” This is not about, what job title do you want next, what exact department do you want? Open the conversation to have them share with you what their strengths are, where they see themselves being utilized. If they see themselves in an office or working remote, if they see themselves collaborating or working independently.

Get a sense of the bigger picture of where they want to go in the future, so that you can then create the plan for them moving ahead. Number two, you need to ask what motivates them.

We want to inspire frequently, motivate occasionally.

But during the times when you do need to motivate, you need to understand how the individual wants to be motivated. Each of us are pushed by certain things, and most often different things. Don’t assume that every single one of your direct reports is motivated by the same thing.

One person may be motivated by a bonus, another person may be motivated by time off, yet another person may be motivated by flexibility. So ask each person as they’re coming onboard, or quite frankly now is your opportunity to ask even your current existing team members, what motivates them. And then finally, number three, ask them, “What are you interested in learning most right now?”

I love asking this question. First of all, it puts the onus on them to decide what they should be learning, what excites them. Then you as their leader can support them in coming up with the game plan to get them there. Which the game plan doesn’t necessarily mean that you’re offering all of the training, but it puts that responsibility on them to be thinking, “Hey, I should be learning something new. What is that?”

Then co-create, collaborate together on building that plan and stay close with them as they are going through that learning and development. Again, perfect time for you to be re-evaluating your onboarding process! If you have several new employees coming in during this time of reshuffling, and really taking the opportunity to create a personalized approach to your onboarding process. Now is the time, get started!

The One Thing to Keep Employees Engaged

The One Thing to Keep Employees Engaged

Look, I know you get it. Disengaged employees are more likely to leave your organization – which means that you as a people leader want to create full engagement, especially with your top talent. You want to make sure that they are engaged in the work that they’re doing, that they are bought into the organization. So how do we go about doing that?

Well, let’s first address that compensation must be deemed fair. For the employees, they’ve got to feel that they’re at least being compensated at a good rate, right? If compensation is too low, that’s the very first thing we need to address. So, let’s assume compensation is deemed fair by the employee. Then you don’t need to rely on perks.

In fact, I just talked about this in a video recently – that we don’t need to rely on perks. If compensation’s fair, these big bonuses and fun rooms and all these other little shiny things really aren’t going to create true engagement that’s going to retain your talent. Don’t rely on the perks. So, we’ve got fair compensation, we don’t need to rely on all the perks, now let’s take it back to the basics.

The foundation that I want to give you is to lead with humanity.

That word, humanity. I mean, just remembering that day in and day out, you are working with a human being. “94482,” those were the last five digits of my employee ID number at my last corporate job, so I get it. I know that we need those identification numbers for confidentiality, for record-keeping, absolutely. But I never wanted to show up to work and have my manager treat me like a number, like an inanimate object.

Don’t do that for your employees. Treating a person like a number is an insult to their humanity. Make sure that you are acknowledging that every single person as a human being has their own past experiences, their own current experiences, their own thoughts, their own feelings, and their own emotions. They are legitimately unique individuals in every single circumstance. So by acknowledging that they are a human being, it’s going to set you up better as a leader to bring them in and see that you care about them.

Now, we are not aiming for popularity; we are aiming for impact.

I am not suggesting that you treat these human beings on your team as if you are best friends. We’re not looking for friendship in what that true word means, but you want to make sure that your team understands and sees that day in and day out, you care about them as a human being. Unfortunately, 59% of employees feel that their company cares more about the revenue than them as a person. Nearly 60%, that is absolutely inexcusable.

So it’s going to start with you as a people leader; get back in touch with the fact that each of these people are individual human beings. That’s going to help you build the foundation so that they know you as their leader truly care about them. And when they know you care about them, they’re going to be more engaged in their role from the start. All right, let’s start looking at people with true lens of humanity!

3 Mistakes Leaders Make When It Comes to Team Burnout

3 Mistakes Leaders Make When It Comes to Team Burnout

Are we seriously still talking about burnout? Yes, unfortunately we are. Now, I have some slight good news for you – across frontline employees, there is a slight reduction in those that are experiencing burnout. Great! However, 40% of people cited burnout as the reason that they left their job. Burnout is the reason that 40% of people left their job.

Now you as a people leader, you’re responsible for not only attracting top talent, you’ve got to hold onto them. You have to be able to retain top talent. So if we know that burnout is the reason that 40% of people are leaving their job, let’s focus in on burnout as a strategy to be able to retain your employees. Today, I’m going to address the top three mistakes that leaders are making when it comes to mitigating your team burnout.

Number one: leaders are not addressing their own burnout.

Does this sound familiar? Leaders, you have to be able to address your own burnout. Look, one of your primary responsibilities as a leader is to inspire and mobilize people toward a goal, a vision. How can you possibly do that if you yourself are showing up completely exhausted, depleted, you have reduced professional efficacy.

There is absolutely no way that you are going to lead others, or even show them how to mitigate their own burnout, when you yourself don’t have a handle on it. I mentioned that we’re starting to see some reduced burnout with frontline employees, but unfortunately for people managers, it has only gotten worse. Gallup reported that across people managers, we went from 28% citing that they were very often or always burned out to 35%.

You must address your own burnout and get that under control if you expect to mitigate the burnout for your team. Mistake number two is relying on perks. Oh, I’m seeing it everywhere. Big bonuses, increased salary, game rooms, free lunches. And look, those are some nice things, but to use an old school metaphor, “That’s just icing on the cake.” The cake itself is disgusting right now, we have to fix the cake!

So as a leader, stop relying on perks. You’ve got to be able to provide foundational things that are going to retain your employees. I saw it firsthand, we had this amazing game room at the office I worked at in my corporate job, but it wasn’t the people who were burned out who were using it. The people who were burned out could care less about the game room. They were just trying to survive. Mistake number two is relying on perks, so let’s find new strategies that aren’t just about the perks.

That should be the icing, not the foundational cake. Right?

All right, mistake number three is thinking that increased responsibilities is a way to develop your employees. So you have an employee who is interested in moving up into a different position or making a lateral move into another department. And you say, “Great, I’m going to have you join this task force, or you’re going to take over this project.” What are you doing? You are just throwing additional responsibilities on their plate when they are already burned out.

Unmanageable workload and unreasonable time pressure are two of the top reasons that people are burned out; two of the top causes right there. So if they’re already feeling like they have an unmanageable workload, your attempt, albeit maybe with good thought, your attempt to provide them development by throwing additional responsibilities on them is only adding to the burnout.

Don’t use additional responsibilities as a way to develop your employees. Take a look at these top three mistakes and start to do some assessment. Pull in the data, take a look what’s in front of you, and see if you can start to remove those mistakes and start to shift strategies so that you can mitigate the burnout and retain your top-tier employees!

Leadership Readiness

Leadership Readiness

I was recently reflecting on my time and experience in the corporate world; what the cultures were, what opportunities I had, the promotions I received or didn’t receive, just all of the dynamics that were happening. And I found something really interesting – over the course of my 15 years, I worked for two companies.

The first one hired me straight out of being an elementary school teacher. They were taking a risk for sure, but shortly after I was hired, I was promoted to an official leadership position. Now, I didn’t have any formal leadership training, I didn’t have formal leadership title or experience on my resume, yet there was something that this senior leadership team saw in me as an opportunity to promote me.

I was an assistant manager, moved into branch manager, I was running an entire branch, hiring, coaching, responsible for a branch’s P&L. Fast forward three years later, and I moved into the second organization. I now have a track record; I have proven results of my leadership experience. Yet, it took several years of me expressing interest in going into a leadership role before I was promoted.

In fact, it took a different manager of mine to get me into that true leadership position. Now, I don’t know exactly what the reasons are. I’ll give everyone a benefit of the doubt, but this brings me to a stale perspective that we see; that too many organizations expect people to be 100% ready, to already have this 100% proven track record before they get promoted to a leadership role. In fact, where is the training that we’re offering?

I didn’t receive any formal training prior; I was self-educated. Even after I got promoted into a formal leadership role, we didn’t have that training. I took it on myself. Well, where are organizations in terms of training?

We should be evaluating our potential leaders, looking at that leadership pipeline and saying, how are we going in and supporting these individuals now and helping them to be ready?

And then, where are some opportunities that are maybe soft approaches, where they can exhibit their leadership skills on projects or task forces that already show before they get promoted? There are also a certain group of people that can meet 80% – 90% of the job requirements; put them in that leadership role, give them the concurrent training, and they will rise to the challenge.

So individuals and organizations, how are we partnering together and taking equal responsibility to rise and raise everyone at the same level? Fill that leadership pipeline. If you want to retain your top talent, they are not looking to make the top salary; pay them fairly and invest in their training, show them that there’s opportunity for growth and development and a future for them at their organization.

This is going to grow top leaders in your organization today. Don’t wait for people to be ready, that is a stale myth! Let’s partner together, let’s find that rising talent, and let’s give them the opportunity. If you’re interested in hearing more about how my team and I go in and really forge new paradigms when it comes to women in leadership, I encourage you to click on the link and book a call with me. I would love to have this conversation with you. Let’s take action today and create top-tier leaders in the workforce.

Women Continue to Rise

Women Continue to Rise

Women continue to rise. Yes! Women continue to rise. Let that sink in. We saw a 10% growth for women in leadership positions between 2015 and 2021. This is fantastic news, But – and yes, there is a but – despite this growth, women’s leadership share does not match their overall representation in the workforce. So look, I want to celebrate the 10% growth, that is fantastic news. But it’s not enough. It is not enough for us to sustain at this rate, at that progress.

We need to join together to accelerate women in leadership positions.

What can we do to really step on the gas and increase that rate? To double or triple it? Organizations need to put into place formal and intentional structures and opportunities to support women for leadership positions. Employee resource groups are one of them, they are fantastic. If you don’t have at least an employee resource group, you need to figure out how you can begin one today.

Mentorship programs – look, the concept of mentoring is wonderful, but if it’s just a concept it’s not working. Organizations need to create formal mentorship programs. There needs to be structure. Look for your rising talent of female leaders, potential female leaders, and assign them a mentor. When you’re bringing in new employees, assign them a mentor and give the mentor the process, the structure, the cadence, to which to make this successful.

We also need male allies. Do the men in your organization even know what that means, or how to become one?

We need to provide them with the tools, the resources, and the education on how they can best support women rising into leadership positions. Only until we have these types of formal structures and programs in place can we get to the one thing that really does accelerate the growth of women in leadership, and that is by having male sponsors. ERG’s, mentoring programs, those are great – but it’s when we have sponsorship, and ideally when we have a male sponsor, that really accelerates women into leadership positions.

I challenge you today, what could you do? How could you take on your power, your influence? You may be an individual who can take over finding a mentor for yourself. Maybe you are already in a leadership position. Where can you have some influence as a key stakeholder to create formal structures and process? What are we doing together to create this true acceleration for women in leadership?

My team and I are forging new paradigms when it comes to women and leadership. And I want to see you forge those new paradigms as well. What are you doing to help promote women in leadership positions, so that we together can accelerate growth? Comment below, I want to hear from you!